History

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Johncock Coat of Arms

Johncock – Definition: Of European heritage, “John” is a derivative of “Jan” from “Jan Utenhove” of Ghent, Belgium.“Cock” is derived from the “Koch” surname from Germany. Coat Of Arms =>

Historically, Koch’s were beer cookers in Germany in the 1400’s.When many migrated to Belgium in the 1500’s, quite a few became weavers in Walloon of southeastern Belgium.Koch was changed to “LeCocq.”

The weaving industry was imported to England in the mid 1500’s and so were the French-speaking LeCocq’s of Walloon.They settled in Canterbury, England.

In 1548, Jan Utenhove and Francios Perrucel founded a French-language church in room of Canterbury Cathedral, calling it the Walloon Church. It was active for twelve years.

One of the church’s earliest members was Den’is LeCocq. Having learned some English, Den’is decided to have an English name. As Jan Utenhove was a respected and beloved countryman, Den’is chose “Jan” as the prefix to go with “cocke” because “that ‘e’ on the end of Cocke did look distinguished.” Over two or three generations, “Jan” changed to “John”. Over time, it has become “Johncock”.

Jancocke Coat of Arms (see image on this page)

The “Jancocke Coat of Arms” has been traced to Salisbury, England.Coat of Arms were granted to a knight or important person and were a Heraldic symbol.They were originally used to cover a suit of armour so the combatants could be identified by the soldiers. It was used in medieval days when most armies were private armies.

Today, the only private army in the United Kingdom is allowed to be raised by the Duke of Athol.He has an army of just a few ceremonial officers and soldiers.

The history of the arms is unfortunately unknown.It is not known who has the right to wear the arms.  These things are still taken very seriously in Scotland, and prosecutions still take place in the Heraldic courts.

People

Johncock is the surname of many famous people such as:

Scientists

  • Robert Koche, (Born 1841) won the Nobel Prize for his tuberculosis research
  • Emil Kocher, (Born 1841) won the Nobel Prize for his work on the thyroid gland.He invented forceps (grasping pincers) which bear his name: Kocher forceps.